FanPost

Quinn vs. Clowney

By now it’s a well-documented fact that I’ve been riding the Anti-Clowney bandwagon since, well, before the 2013 season. I took all the red flags, the entourage, the perceived lack of effort, and the bust potential, at face value. I crusaded against him tirelessly, without ever even giving him the benefit of the doubt. It’s funny how soon we forget the red flags that surrounded Robert Quinn during his draft evaluation process. How do the two compare?

Production

Quinn: During his shortened tenure with the Tarheels Quinn played two seasons, including a one as a starter during his sophomore year. His stats are as follows:

Tackles

Def Int

Fumbles

Year

School

Conf

Class

Pos

G

Solo

Ast

Tot

Loss

Sk

Int

Yds

Avg

TD

PD

FR

Yds

TD

FF

*2008

North Carolina

ACC

FR

DL

12

22

12

34

6.5

2.0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

*2009

North Carolina

ACC

SO

DL

13

35

17

52

19.0

11.0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

6

Career

North Carolina

57

29

86

25.5

13.0

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

8

Clowney: The #1 player in the nation out of high school, Clowney started for the Gamecocks as a true freshman. He followed up an SEC Freshman of the Year campaign with a stellar sophomore season. It’s no secret that his Junior season was a disappointment. His stats are as follows:

Tackles

Def Int

Fumbles

Year

School

Conf

Class

Pos

G

Solo

Ast

Tot

Loss

Sk

Int

Yds

Avg

TD

PD

FR

Yds

TD

FF

*2011

South Carolina

SEC

JR

DL

13

17

19

36

12.0

8.0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

5

*2012

South Carolina

SEC

JR

DL

40

14

54

23.5

13.0

0

0

0

2

1

2

0

3

*2013

South Carolina

SEC

JR

DE

28

12

40

11.5

3.0

4

1

Career

South Carolina

85

45

130

47.0

24.0

0

0

0

7

1

2

0

9

Pass Rushing

Quinn: Robert Quinn used elite explosiveness and a myriad of moves to dominate the college game. His style was more one of finesse, utilizing elite-caliber spin, rip and swim moves. His straight-line speed was above average but he combined impressive lateral agility and quickness to bend the edge. A big knock on him when he came out was that he was one-dimensional. Analysts only saw him as only a speed rusher, and never someone that could bull rush effectively.

Clowney: Clowney is better than Quinn was in some categories, but lacks in others. Both used elite explosiveness off the snap but Quinn never had Clowney’s combination of straight-line speed and raw power. Jadeveon’s swim and rip moves are elite but he lacks a spin move and the ability to bend the edge effectively. Unlike Quinn, Clowney can line up in a four-point stance and tee off on the tackle opposite him. He dominates at the point of attack.

Against the Run

Quinn: In college, Robert Quinn was never effective in this area of his game. He lacked the strength to anchor against the run and never showed a high level of awareness. At times he would use his quickness to get into the backfield, but more often than not he was taken upfield and out of the play. Amazingly, he’s become one of the best run-defending defensive ends in the league. All it took was time.

Clowney: Jadeveon Clowney is as impressive against the run as a he is against the pass. When he’s not exploding into the backfield, he’s anchoring and disengaging when the ball carrier comes to him. Many teams ran away from him this year, but he still found a way to be involved in almost every play. In many instances he used his elite speed to track down the runner. It’s this aspect of his game that makes him intriguing as a Joker piece.

Red Flags

Quinn: Following his sophomore campaign, Quinn was forced to sit out his junior year because of NCAA infractions. On top of that, there were concerns about a benign tumor in his brain. If it weren’t for these red flags he probably would’ve been a top-10, maybe even top-5, pick.

Clowney: Oh how we all love to nit pick here. After "The Hit" there were rumors that he would sit out his junior season in order to avoid injury. He claimed he was "unblockable" and began to travel with an entourage. Accusations have been made about him taking plays off, but I don’t see it on the tape. When he’s on the field, he’s going full speed. He doesn’t quit on plays, even when the offense plays away from him.

Conclusion: I hate to say it, but Clowney is a better prospect than Quinn was when he came out. I’m even starting to drool over his combination of size, speed, and explosiveness. He is the only player that could upgrade our defensive line. I’d give Houston a 50-50 shot at taking him, and if they don’t I would seriously consider picking Clowney at 2. Using him as a Joker piece would give us a defense that no other team could hope to emulate.

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join Turf Show Times

You must be a member of Turf Show Times to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Turf Show Times. You should read them.

Join Turf Show Times

You must be a member of Turf Show Times to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Turf Show Times. You should read them.

Spinner

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9341_tracker